Pasta with Tender Ramps

Our Farmer’s Market is set to open up this weekend, but until it does I frequent a tiny spot in the produce section of Whole Foods where I can score some really fresh seasonal goodies. When I find something of interest, I get very excited. I enjoy the little thrill from not having a recipe in mind and I also love seeing if I can stump the fine people at the checkout. I find that they are better than most at knowing their produce and sometimes they’ll ask what I’m making. It’s the little things. Pasta with Tender Ramps Recipe // Dula Notes I spied ramps recently and it was the first time I’d ever seen them. In a terrible turn of events, I purchased ramps, mussels and the fixings for baklava before I came down with a terrible cold. When I had a burst of energy, I prepared the mussels and baklava and then discovered that evening that I could not taste anything. Have you ever witnessed someone trying to taste something? It isn’t pretty. I chewed slowly, concentrating, while my eyes darted back and forth. I thought if I tried hard enough that I could taste just a little bit. I was pretty fascinated by the whole thing because I could detect sweet, sour or salt, but there was no flavor.

Luckily my taste buds perked up just in time for this dish. I wanted to use both the bulbs and the leaves and this recipe from The Splendid Table fit the bill. It is prepared with simple ingredients and the flavor of the ramps really comes through. I highly recommend this for a quick meal that really showcases the mild onion and garlic flavor from the ramps. You can easily halve the recipe below, but I always use a full pound of pasta when making pasta dishes to clinch delicious leftovers for lunch during the week.

12 Notes Leave a Note

  1. Wow, this looks great. I’ve been really into simple pasta dishes as of late and this fits right in with my tastes. That recipe is so easy to memorize, too. Thanks for sharing.

  2. Ughh I hate when I’m eating something I KNOW is really amazing, but I can’t taste it! Glad you could taste this dish… It looks delicious! 🙂

    • Sues – A foodie losing his/her sense of taste is pure torture! I also felt like I was eating more because the process of eating was so unsatisfying. I’m elated that it’s back!

      Kimberley – I read on Wikipedia that the city of Chicago was named after ramps, which was called Chicagou by native tribes. Crazy, huh? I was very surprised to read that ramps don’t really grow in the west.

  3. I’m kind of in love with ramps right now. But they don’t grow on the west coast, so they’re both hard to come by and also expensive. I want to put them in everything, including this.

  4. Ah ramps, a rare treat to be found. I’ve only had it twice, both times when visiting my parents in Wisconsin after a trip to the Dane County Farmers Market in Madison (have you been?). The first time we used them in a frittata, and the second was atop grilled pizza with mozzarella and Grana Padano. Love the pasta idea, too — quick and easy for a weeknight dinner, showcasing one of late spring’s finest offerings. Crushed red chilli flakes a must!

    Glad you’re feeling well again,

    *Heather*

    • Heather – I have never been to Wisconsin, sadly! The frittata and grilled pizza sound fantastic. I was just day dreaming about a spring pizza 😉

      Kasey – It was my first time using ramps and I’ll be sure to look out for them every spring now! I’m feeling much, much better, thanks 🙂

  5. I hate being sick and not being able to taste food 🙁 Glad you are feeling better! I must say I have never cooked with ramps, but seeing them everywhere around the web, I am really excited to try them!

    • Hey Kim! Ramps are available for a few weeks in spring. I’ve found them at Whole Foods and markets with lots of produce. The best way to describe the flavor is a mild green onion with a touch of mild garlic flavor. It’s unique and tasty!

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